Thrifty Finds

This week’s Thrifty Finds (24-30 July)

 

This Week's Thrifty Finds via secondhandtales.wordpress.com

Hope you had a good week and – if you’re in the UK – the start of the school holidays are going well (apart from the weather!)

I was very proud of myself last week as I chose not to buy something. Do you ever have that conundrum where you think you should buy an outfit for an event, when actually you don’t want to, and don’t think you’ll ever wear it again anyway?

  1. My friends got married. It was a gorgeous, homespun event, using the skills and time of many local friends who made a cake, decorated the garden, cooked the food, grew the flowers etc. Earlier in the week I thought I needed to buy an outfit for the wedding. However the weather forecast was wet and cold and whatever I bought would not keep me warm or dry (the reception was being held in their garden). While browsing the Sales rack in Debenhams I had an epiphany: I didn’t need to buy a new outfit for the wedding! Going to a special event is not about what you wear. So, in the end, I wore the second hand Henry Holland dress I picked up a couple of weeks ago, with a thrifted cardigan and second hand velvet jacket that I’ve had for years.

As the reception was only in the village, I popped home after the service and changed into layers and a warmer pair of trousers. In the end, the rain held off and it was a fantastic evening party that went on into the small hours….!

2. It was a party weekend as my youngest daughter held her ninth birthday party on Sunday. I took her and five friends to the cinema. Rather pricey, but I bought popcorn and juice cartons from home to save on the cost of snacks.

3. On instagram I commented on a couple of charity shop magazines that @mamathriftstyle  had picked up from her local Oxfam and Barnardos stores. Anyway, it turns out she lives in Bath and very kindly dropped them off for me to read 🙂

4. I continued to search for activity books for the kids to take on holiday and found a code breaking book in the Julian House charity shop: perfect for my daughter who loves puzzles and codes.

5. Summer holidays means time to sort things out and do some decluttering with the girls. Over the past couple of years they have been lucky enough to have been given some DS and Wii games from family and friends. They sorted through those games they didn’t use and we took them to the local Games Exchange shop. In return we received a £35 (!) voucher which we will (partly) spend on dvds for the summer.

Are you decluttering this summer?I’d love to hear about your Thrifty Finds! Please  share your Thrifty Finds on my facebook page, or use #thriftyfinds on Twitter or instagram

Second-hand Hygge.

Second hand Hygge via ssecondhandtales.wordpress.com

Have you come across ‘Hygge’ this winter? It’s the latest concept to come out of Denmark and, loosely translated, means a sense of feeling cosy at the darkest time of the year. As today is the shortest day of the year I thought I would share the post I wrote for Barnardo’s The Thrift website on how to do Hygge on a budget. You can read about it here: https://the-thrift.co.uk/2016/11/29/hygge-the-thrifty-way/

 

 

My post from The Thrift: Why I’m still charity shopping in my forties

Last month I wrote a post for the wonderful The-Thrift blog, which promotes shopping at Barnardo’s charity shops.

I wrote about why I’m in my mid-forties and still sourcing my wardrobe from charity shops and other second-hand sources. Here is a (slightly) updated version:

As someone in their mid 40s you would have thought that charity shopping is something I’d grown out of by now. But I guess I have been second-hand shopping for so many decades that my brain is now hardwired to head straight for the thrift stores.  I also love the thrill of a bargain, the individuality of charity shop purchases and the feeling I get from giving to a good cause, such as Barnardo’s. And there’s other reasons as well:

1) It’s something I haven’t grown out of. I first started second-hand shopping in my early teens when charity stores circa 1985 were very different to the ones you see now. Ironically, although these places were frowned upon they were stocked with amazing pieces from the ’50s and ’60s that would now be classed as vintage.

Charity Shop find from early 1990s.

Charity Shop find from early 1990s.

2) It’s my own personal style and no one will have the same outfit as me. I have to confess this was the reason I began charity shopping many years ago. As a student I wanted to look individual. I wanted to wear the shirt, jacket or shorts that no one else had. I guess this is a habit that has stuck with me.

3) It’s cheap. As a teenager of the 1980s I imagined my future self to be some highly driven career woman buying all my clothes from designer shops  – or M&S at least. When I worked full time in my twenties I did buy my work clothes from High Street stores. However since having children and taking on a range of part time and freelance work, I have less of a budget, or indeed a need, for buying first hand workwear. As a result I can stock my casual wardrobe with low price second-hand clothes.

4) It encourages re-use, and donating to good causes. Long before we knew about the three Rs charity shops were there to enable us to buy re-used clothing. I truly believe that by purchasing second-hand we are extending the life of a garment. We are ensuring the resources that are used to make, transport and package it are stretched for just a little longer.  Our hard earned cash is also going back into the charity pot, rather than into the hands of an anonymous corporation.  But in order to keep the cycle going we must remember to donate our unwanted clothing to charity shops too.

donating to charity shops

 

5) ) I’m a ‘bargain hunter’ . This comes down to the fact that I love browsing and getting a good bargain! Last month I bought a brilliant denim shirt dress for a fiver from the British Heart Foundation shop. I’d been coveting a similar one from Fat Face for £45!

£5 denim dress

While I never believe you should dress ‘age appropriate’ there are a few charity shop outfits that I no longer aspire to wear. Browsing through all the great posts from other (younger) The Thrift bloggers I know there are dress lengths and styles that I no longer feel comfortable wearing. However the nineteen year old who used to wear a pair of shorts made from old curtains is still there – she just has to turn the curtains into a below the knee dress now…

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My guest post for The Thrift: Why I’m still charity shopping in my forties

the thrift guest post

Last month I was asked to write a guest post for The Thrift. This is a blog run by the Barnardos UK charity, promoting their chain of more than 640 shops throughout the country. Barnardos is a well-established charity that cares for vulnerable children (when I was at school I remember being given a Barnardo’s money box to save donations in).

My guest post for The Thrift can be found here. It’s all about why I still find myself charity shopping in my forties (maybe I haven’t grown up yet!)

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